Tag Archives: winter

January 29 Sunset From Santee Lakes

January 29 Sunset From Santee Lakes

January 29 from Santee Lakes

Sunset in landscape orientation from Mast Blvd bridge

Tonight, the January 29 sunset from Santee Lakes was spectacular.  By this time of year, I am getting home from the office with time to spare to catch the last light.  The high clouds this afternoon looked like they were setting up perfectly and it did not disappoint.

Because Santee Lakes closes at 5 PM this this of year, I don’t have time to enter the park and shoot inside.  However, the Mast Blvd bridge is a perfect vantage point overlooking Lake 2.  You have a wide view of the park, Mission Trails and Cowles Mountain, as well as plenty of water and sky to balance the image.

My home is near the corner of Fanita Parkway and Mast Blvd, and there are a couple other overlooks that provide nice views at sunset.

It really is amazing how much of a difference the winter season makes for the light in Southern California.  These high clouds are amazing, and maybe not an unusual sight in areas closers to the normal path of the jet steam, but they aren’t always prevalent in Southern California.

Below, I have included a gallery of several images taken in several overlooks and in different image orientations.  I believe the Sunset in landscape from Mast Blvd is the best.  Let me know if you have a preference!

As always, I thank you very much for reading, and I hope you enjoy the images!

Grand Bixby by T.M. Schultze

January 2015 Photo of the Month: Grand Bixby

My January 2015 Photo of the Month is Grand Bixby, an image made of the world-famous Bixby Canyon Bridge in Big Sur. Continue reading

False Kiva, Winter

False Kiva, Winter

My good friend Jeremy Long and I ventured out into frozen Winter Utah to see many sights, not the least of which was Canyonlands National Park’s False Kiva ruin.

False Kiva, Winter

False Kiva, Winter

I don’t know who discovered this location, but I do know that Tom Till has the first image I ever saw from it. He is certainly the person who has made False Kiva famous.

There is no sign pointing you to False Kiva. The National Park Service does acknowledge it’s existence though, and you can get simple directions from an NPS Ranger. It is up to the individual to translate those simple directions into locating the ruin.

I don’t wish to write too much about the hike here, but it is advisable to have plenty of water and any backcountry gear in case of an emergency. While the hike is not long, you will not be close to help if you need it.

One issue I wanted to bring up is conservation and the larger photographic community. From what I have been told, False Kiva has not been the subject of archaeological study. When these happen, one of the most valuable resources is the midden. A midden is basically the landfill for Ancestral Puebloans (and other groups). Much can be learned from what the inhabitants disposed of.

At False Kiva, the midden is behind the ruin. The location is also a very tempting location for a photographer. There is a chain link across the midden asking people to not stand on it. Alas, when we visited, the chain was on the ground. Apparently, some photographers have decided to stand on it. This may ruin any archaeological value the ruin has.

I wanted to mention this to ask again that the community respect these signs and follow the rules, or there will be fewer and fewer places available to us to photograph. The location of False Kiva creates an incredible composition. Imagine if this place was closed off to people permanently.