Tag Archives: skyfire

Photography In San Diego Weather

Weather is tough to predict, even for meteorologists.  Landscape photographers have the challenging task of reading the weather and deciding when to get their gear out and when to wait for another day.

I live in San Diego, which has a reputation for constant sunny weather.  The truth is that weather in this area is much more complicated and nuanced.  I have spent many years learning, and being frustrated on the way, waiting for the perfect weather to make landscape images.

As with most areas, approaching and clearing storms provide amazing, dramatic, light.  Because San Diego sits in an arid environment, there are only a few storms per year.  These weather systems usually generate a lot of buzz, and for photographers, it is relatively straight-forward to be ready.

Spring and Fall weather are strongly influenced by the onshore flow, also known as marine layer, which blows in every evening from the Pacific coast.  I have had many lovely evenings end with zero light at sunset due to this phenomenon.  Sometimes, the fog is subtle, and I have been headed down Interstate 8 to Sunset Cliffs only to go from sunny skies to dark overcast just one mile from the coast.  If you have heard of “May Gray” or “June Gloom,” then you know what this looks like.

Summers prevent the onshore flow from greatly influencing the weather, but what seems to be a plethora of high pressure systems prevents the North American jet stream from veering far enough South to bring us weather systems.  Occasionally, a system will blow in from the Pacific south of the jet steam, sometimes called the Pineapple Express.  These weather systems seem to be pretty rare.

In the height of Summer, the monsoon season which affects the Southwest deserts occasionally makes it way to San Diego County.  I like to head to East County when these systems develop in the afternoon.  I have found, though, that while these cumulonimbus clouds look impressive at noon, they are often scattered from high elevation winds by sunset.  These are typically not a red sunset.

The Fall brings much of the same onshore flow from the Spring, so the same rules apply.

The Winter is my favorite season to photograph.  The Pacific current keeps temperatures cool, so onshore flow is slow to develop.  In addition, San Diego seems to develop more higher elevation cloud systems in the afternoons.  The higher the clouds, the better to photograph at sunset.  This is the time of season where you need your gear with you at all times.  Clear the schedule.  Watch at all times.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my friends app, Skyfire, at http://www.skyfireapp.com.  This application will provide you some intelligence on reading the weather and selecting the best locations at sunrise and sunset.  I am a paid subscriber myself, and use it several times a week to give me some insight into what to expect out in the field.

It is important that wherever you live, you invest time and energy in learning your local area’s prevailing weather patterns.  Do your homework, because some people aim to make lucky photographs, but an artist aims to make prepared photographs.  Be the latter person.

Skyfire – A Review of the App

Skyfire – A Review of the App

Skyfire App

Skyfire App

One of my photography friends, Matthew Kuhns, has released a new app called Skyfire.  The app has appeared on Petapixel, so it has already received a good amount of promotion so far.

As a user of the app, I thought I would include a few notes about the app and what value it brings to the landscape photographer.

Weather is complicated, and I am often faced with making value judgments on the locations to choose for sunrises and sunsets.  Some I have accurately selected, but what sticks with me are the times I got it wrong.

Living in the San Diego area, the majority of the days are sunny, which do not necessarily make for the most engaging photographs.  The right type of clouds entering or leaving the area are rare.  In addition, for a good portion of the year, the onshore flow produces a marine layer that are usually death for the light needed in the morning and evening.  Sometimes I head to the coast for what I think will be a great image, only to find the marine is just a couple miles inland and ready to kill the light.

Skyfire is the first app to attempt the incredible challenge of using weather predictions to forecast the right type of light.  The interface is simple.  With a login, you are taken to the member interface.  The first you will see is the prediction for the nearest sunrise or sunset.  A Google Map and a static map are included.  Visually, it works as a heat map.  Dark blues are complete cloud cover with little light, light blues are clear skies with no clouds, and the colors warm from there until you may have light and dark reds when the landscape is really going to light up.

The first question everyone asks is:  Is it accurate?  My experience has been that the app has been extremely accurate.  I have spoken to Matt the few times the app was off, and most of the time, it ended up being an inaccurate weather forecast.  We know what they say about predicting the weather.

There have been a couple occasions recently that not only did the app give me a good indication that I should be out shooting at the right time, but gave me good insight into where in the area I should go.  For an app that is attempting to forecast light in the entire United States, this is excellent.

So, would I recommend this app?  If you are a landscape photographer, who wants the best images at the far margins of every day, before sunrise and after sunset, then I highly recommend this app.  For $25.00 a year, you will gain insight that will help you pick the right days and the best areas to photograph.  Just one image that you wouldn’t have shot without the app makes the price easily worth it.

The app is currently html-based with plans to eventually be available on iOs and Android.  Visit Skyfire at www.skyfireapp.com.