Tag Archives: national park

Three Shafts Of Light, by T.M. Schultze

August 2016 Photo Of The Month: Wildflowers, Great Sand Dunes, Black And White

My August 2016 Photo of the Month is Wildflowers, Great Sand Dunes, Black and White.  I made this image during the height of the monsoon season in Great Sand Dunes National Park. Continue reading

Overlooked 2015 Photographs

Overlooked 2015 Photographs

I have a lot of overlooked 2015 photographs.  Much of this comes from taking the images but not getting around to processing them at home!  I get busy just like everybody, so I thought I would make this post and show a few that I have overlooked.

The Hungry Hippo

The Hungry Hippo

The Hungry Hippo in Joshua Tree National Park

This is a cool rock formation near Jaguar Rock in Joshua Tree National Park.  Curiously, this was the first time I photographed it.  This was just after sunrise in temperatures in the low 20s.

To me, this rock reminded me of the Hungry Hungry Hippos game from my childhood.

 

 

 

 

Storm Over Borrego Springs

Storm Over Borrego Springs

Storm Over Borrego Springs

This was a great photo day where I took a great image from the Borrego Springs overlook on S-22 of a rainbow, but I neglected to process many of the storm images from the valley floor.  The weather was very impressive on that day.

A Storm At The Motor Transport Museum

Motor Transport Museum

Motor Transport Museum

The Motor Transport Museum in Campo is such a unique place, with possibly hundreds of old decaying vehicles from brands I didn’t even know existed.  The San Diego Photo Club went there on a trip, when a storm hit, and I never got around to processing these images.  The vibrant colors with the moody cloud cover makes for a great contrast.  I need to revisit soon.

The Desert View Tower

Desert View Tower Old Highway 80

Desert View Tower Old Highway 80

I have always ignored this place, although it is an important landmark for my Old Highway 80 Photography Project.

This was the last stop along US Route 80 before it descended the In-Ko-Pah Gorge to the Imperial Valley.  The road ends here, but concrete remnants follow Myer Creek all the way to the town of Ocotillo.

I have many more overlooked images, but I thought this selection would make for a nice post.

Thank you for reading, and I hope you enjoy the images!

Sunrise From Mastodon Peak, by T.M. Schultze

Christmas Eve From Joshua Tree

Christmas Eve From Joshua Tree

Christmas Eve From Joshua Tree

Christmas Eve From Joshua Tree

Spending Christmas in Joshua Tree National Park is a personal tradition for me.  On that note, I will be out in the park on the 24th and 25th, so I am showing this image from last year’s Christmas morning in Joshua Tree. Continue reading

Joshua Tree Photo Guide – Down To The Wire

The Photographer’s Guide To Joshua Tree National Park will be coming out next month!  On behalf of my co-author, Jeremy Long, I am very excited for the first edition release.  The Guide will be available in multiple formats, Ibooks, Kindle, Nook, and a PDF edition.  All should be readable on the device of your choice.

This is the point where finishing the guide becomes extremely stressful.  Text must be completed, and then proceed through multiple revisions.  Image placement will need to be just perfect.  Every detail must be looked at, and most importantly, the book needs to be released.  I am a perfectionist, and the quest for that perfection often results in little work completed.  I am very much looking forward to the completion of the guide so we can proceed to the next one.

Purchase and download instructions will be available at www.jtphotoguide.com once we are completed!

That Perfect Image Rarely Happens On The First Attempt – Adventures in Yosemite National Park

This past weekend, I journeyed to Yosemite National Park with long-time friend, colleague, and fellow photographer, Jeremy Long.  We were looking to make an image showing Upper Cathedral Lake at sunset, with reflection from beautiful Cathedral Peak.

On paper, the hike did not look imposing.  My map indicated it was about 3.5 miles each way.  Despite not having ideal weather (the forecast called for clear skies), we were excited to make the journey and add a new image to our respective portfolios.  This looked like a simple, single-day hike.

As we learn, time and again, it rarely works that way.  The hike up the John Muir Trail (the reverse of how most people travel from Happy Isles to Tuolomne Meadows) was tougher than we thought.  This was especially true for me, carrying much more equipment in my backpack than I needed.

I also found that the hike was quite a bit longer than written on paper.  My GPS noted the distance to the correct side of Upper Cathedral Lake at 5.3 miles.  The paper mileage was 50% wrong!  In addition, we quickly realized that the proper image was taken way up on the dome outcropping to the south.  Only, after Jeremy and I scoured separate sections of rock, we did not find the best spot.  The reflection of Cathedral Peak was either obscured by the shoreline, or we were lined up correctly but there were trees in the way.

Eventually, we both found a large outcropping that appeared to be in the right spot.  The bouldering appeared to be tough, and the light was growing dim.  However, with sunset growing close, and an additional 5+ miles back to Tuolomne Meadows, it wasn’t ideal to take more chances.

We hiked back that evening tired, beat up, and sore.  As always, one must remember to never trust the map.  Besides the mileage, the hike was tougher than appeared on paper, and failed to take into account the extra work we needed to make the best image possible.  We didn’t have the high clouds we dreamed of either, so in this case, we counted it as strictly a scouting trip.

The next time we go, we will be more prepared from this experience.  And that is the whole point of scouting out locations.  We know what to expect.  We will plan for an entire weekend and camp at the lake.  We will be there earlier, with more time to scale the rock outcroppings to reach our best location.  And we will give ourselves that much more chance to make the image we are dreaming of.

The lesson is to never discount the work it takes to make an image, long before the perfect scene reveals itself to you.  If your trip doesn’t go perfect, remember the value in the experience and the knowledge you have gained.  It will give you an edge the next time you are ready to make that photography.

TM
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