Tag Archives: Joshua Tree National Park

Garrett's Arch by T.M. Schultze

Garrett’s Arch

Garrett's Arch by T.M. Schultze

Garrett’s Arch by T.M. Schultze

I recently trekked to Garrett’s Arch in Joshua Tree National Park.  Garrett’s Arch is likely the largest arch in Joshua Tree, although another unpublicized arch could give it competition.

Garrett’s Arch is located in the Wonderland of Rocks backcountry.  The trailhead begins at the Wall Street Mill parking lot, proceeding briefly before veering left towards the Wonderland Ranch/Wiley’s Market ruins.  Proceeding behind it, you will pick up the Wonderland Wash and follow it.

At about 0.72 miles, you should reach Jaguar Rock.  This is your first major landmark along the way.  After Jaguar Rock, the wash will enter a valley.  Proceed north.  Keep in mind that the Wonderland Wash will veer North but to the left.  This will take away from your destination.

Find the wash just to the right of Wonderland Wash, and you will pick it up through another canyon.  Keep going until you reach Three Freak Brothers to your right.  This is an easy-to-spot rock formation, and will alert you to the proper time to turn right.  The immediate right requires bouldering.  Keep North to the next turn and you will pick up the side canyon and save some energy.

Immediately, you should spot the Red Obelisk, another beautiful formation in the middle of the canyon.  Once again, the canyon will open up to another valley.  Keep going East, but veer North of the rock formations in the middle of the valley.  After you pass, you will pick up your last canyon.  Keep looking left in that canyon, and you will easily locate the arch.

Keep in the mind that the arch is in a difficult location.  A moderate but dangerous and slippery rock scramble will get you to a ledge below the arch.  There is another high wall that prevents entry to the arch itself.  The arch is also covered in the back by a large growing tree, so seeing “through” the arch is obscured.

A wide-angle lens is needed from this location.  You can also stand on the rocks in the canyon to get a larger image.

The mileage came out to 2.1 to 2.4 miles and is mostly easy, with some very minor rock scrambling.

Joshua Tree Photo Guide – Down To The Wire

The Photographer’s Guide To Joshua Tree National Park will be coming out next month!  On behalf of my co-author, Jeremy Long, I am very excited for the first edition release.  The Guide will be available in multiple formats, Ibooks, Kindle, Nook, and a PDF edition.  All should be readable on the device of your choice.

This is the point where finishing the guide becomes extremely stressful.  Text must be completed, and then proceed through multiple revisions.  Image placement will need to be just perfect.  Every detail must be looked at, and most importantly, the book needs to be released.  I am a perfectionist, and the quest for that perfection often results in little work completed.  I am very much looking forward to the completion of the guide so we can proceed to the next one.

Purchase and download instructions will be available at www.jtphotoguide.com once we are completed!

Partnering in Photography

In about six months, I am planning to co-author my first book, the
Photographer’s Guide To Joshua Tree National Park. My co-author and lifelong friend, Jeremy Long are extremely excited to bring this project to fruition.

Speaking for myself, I can’t wait to finish this guide for artists and photographers everywhere to enjoy. I am also quite nervous. Good artists are endlessly creative, but good artists who are smart also know how to bring a project to completion.

This goes against my perfectionist nature. Left to my own devices, I have no doubt that I would spend an eternity writing, rewriting, rearranging, redoing, starting over, and spinning in circles. Putting this guide together with a partner gives me a person who can push me to do my best work, but also work toward a defined result.

Partnering is very important. Nobody really makes it on their own. Even Ansel Adams had Alfred Stieglitz and Ed Weston. Ask any successful photographer and artist, and they will tell you that partnering and networking are crucial to being successful in their field.

This isn’t my strong suit, and I need the help. I can write pages and pages about carefully planning to shoot a scene in the best light, but thinking about networking with others and building relationships is lost on me.

This book makes me ponder my personal strengths and weaknesses. One of the keys in partnering with others is to find people who can help you with your weak points. Ideally, your strengths can then be a source of inspiration and mentorship for others as well. Don’t go it alone. Make the success of your friends and colleagues part of everything you do.

If all goes well, the Photographer’s Guide To Joshua Tree National Park will be the culmination of the efforts of two people with different expertise and strengths. We will seek to build a guide that provides the motivated photographer some tools to begin building a strong Joshua Tree portfolio. The book will not be exhaustive, because that is impossible. We are excited to bring this project to you and hope it is a welcome addition to the photography field.

– TM
www.tmschultze.com/old-wordpress/old-wordpress