Tag Archives: east county

Awesome field of California poppies near the summit.

Volcan Mountain Storm Hiking

Volcan Mountain Storm Hiking

My friend Alex Kunz and I decided a storm was the perfect time to get out and make some images.  This time, we picked Volcan Mountain outside of Julian, California.  We hiked in from the fire road to the Five Oaks Trail before reaching the summit.  This is a collection of images from the hike.

As always, clicking on any of the images will launch a slideshow.

While making images in the fog is always a lot of fun, there were other highlights.  The manzanitas looked amazing in the rain, with a beautiful sheen from the precipitation.  It was a unique look.

We also experienced “tree rain.”  For the most part, it wasn’t raining while we were hiking.  However, there was an immense amount of water in the trees, so every time the wind kicked up, rain dropped on us from above.

While the wildflower season is over in the lower elevations, we were pleasantly surprised to find beautiful wildflowers in the 4,000 to 5,200 elevations on Volcan Mountain.  The lupine were huge, if not sparse.  And as luck would have it, Alex wanted to check out a side trail on the top and wondered what the source of the orange was in the distance.  I immediately knew we were looking at California Poppies.  I had no idea they could be found in San Diego County, but it was perfect habitat.  On the wet side of the mountain, on an undisturbed hillside, it reminded me of the poppies that grown on Figureroa Mountain where I had been only weeks before.  This was an excellent treat.

Photography In San Diego Weather

Weather is tough to predict, even for meteorologists.  Landscape photographers have the challenging task of reading the weather and deciding when to get their gear out and when to wait for another day.

I live in San Diego, which has a reputation for constant sunny weather.  The truth is that weather in this area is much more complicated and nuanced.  I have spent many years learning, and being frustrated on the way, waiting for the perfect weather to make landscape images.

As with most areas, approaching and clearing storms provide amazing, dramatic, light.  Because San Diego sits in an arid environment, there are only a few storms per year.  These weather systems usually generate a lot of buzz, and for photographers, it is relatively straight-forward to be ready.

Spring and Fall weather are strongly influenced by the onshore flow, also known as marine layer, which blows in every evening from the Pacific coast.  I have had many lovely evenings end with zero light at sunset due to this phenomenon.  Sometimes, the fog is subtle, and I have been headed down Interstate 8 to Sunset Cliffs only to go from sunny skies to dark overcast just one mile from the coast.  If you have heard of “May Gray” or “June Gloom,” then you know what this looks like.

Summers prevent the onshore flow from greatly influencing the weather, but what seems to be a plethora of high pressure systems prevents the North American jet stream from veering far enough South to bring us weather systems.  Occasionally, a system will blow in from the Pacific south of the jet steam, sometimes called the Pineapple Express.  These weather systems seem to be pretty rare.

In the height of Summer, the monsoon season which affects the Southwest deserts occasionally makes it way to San Diego County.  I like to head to East County when these systems develop in the afternoon.  I have found, though, that while these cumulonimbus clouds look impressive at noon, they are often scattered from high elevation winds by sunset.  These are typically not a red sunset.

The Fall brings much of the same onshore flow from the Spring, so the same rules apply.

The Winter is my favorite season to photograph.  The Pacific current keeps temperatures cool, so onshore flow is slow to develop.  In addition, San Diego seems to develop more higher elevation cloud systems in the afternoons.  The higher the clouds, the better to photograph at sunset.  This is the time of season where you need your gear with you at all times.  Clear the schedule.  Watch at all times.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention my friends app, Skyfire, at http://www.skyfireapp.com.  This application will provide you some intelligence on reading the weather and selecting the best locations at sunrise and sunset.  I am a paid subscriber myself, and use it several times a week to give me some insight into what to expect out in the field.

It is important that wherever you live, you invest time and energy in learning your local area’s prevailing weather patterns.  Do your homework, because some people aim to make lucky photographs, but an artist aims to make prepared photographs.  Be the latter person.